Preservative-Free Product Pitfalls

Preservative has become a dirty word. The compounds that were once added to manufactured goods so they could last longer on the shelf and in your home have become an invasive species that we want eliminated entirely. Good, bad, or neutral. Brands have already begun popping up, touting their preservative-free lines. The problem is, a preservative-free beauty routine might not be entirely possible. Nuori is a prime example.

Screen Shot 2015-12-16 at 1.48.31 PMPhoto courtesy of wallpaper.com and Nuori.com

No doubt, some of these chemical preservatives might post health risks, but they also prevent illness. If a beauty product (or any product for that matter) has water in it, then it needs to have a preservative. Without a preservative, there is almost a guarantee that bacteria will grow in the container. Water supports life, and the moist, warm interior of your face cream’s jar makes a mighty fine environment for bacteria to flourish.


In order to produce a product that has no preservatives but also serves no health risk, requires the formulators to swap water for silicone or oil. If you’re acne-prone, you know what kind of potential problems this can create. Even if you’re not acne prone, using oil-based products for every step of your routine can run the risk of breaking you out, particularly if they’re oils that are incompatible with your skin type.

If you’re still feeling like you’d rather go preservative-free, no problem! Just make sure you do your research, don’t buy in bulk, and be diligent with your routine. If you’re someone who tends to buy a lotion, and then let it sit in your medicine cabinet until the end of eternity, then a preservative-free beauty routine is probably not for you. You’ll waste money, risk infection, and have to throw out your products before you’ve been able to finish them!


Also, you know that little jar symbol on your beauty products that you never knew was for and didn’t care to look up? It’s the expiration date of your product. If it says 12M, that means 12 months until it expires. 6M? 6 months. And so on.

pao_symbol_12m
So now you know!

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